Hem & Onc - Pathology (RBC Pathologies) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Hem & Onc - Pathology (RBC Pathologies) Deck (16):
1

What is another name for acanthocytes? With what kinds of pathology should you associate acanthocytes?

Spur cells; (1) Liver disease (2) Abetalipoproteinemia (states of cholesterol dysfunction)

2

How can you distinguish acanthocytes (spur cells) from echinocytes (burr cells)?

Acanthocytes = irregularly spaced spines; Echinocytes have more regularly spaced projections (also, seen in GP6D deficiency)

3

With what kinds of pathology should you associate basophilic stippling?

(1) Anemia of Chronic Disease (2) Alcohol abuse (3) Lead poisoning (4) Thalassemias; Think: "BASically, ACiD Alcohol is LeThal."

4

With what kind of pathology should you associate bite cells?

GP6D deficiency

5

With what kind of pathology should you associate elliptocytes?

Hereditary elliptocytosis

6

With what kinds of pathology should you associate macro-ovalocytes?

(1) Megaloblastic anemia (2) Marrow failure

7

What kinds of abnormal blood smear findings are associated with megaloblastic anemia?

(1) Macro-ovalocytes (2) Hypersegmented PMNs

8

With what kind of pathology should you associate ringed sideroblasts? What do ringed sideroblasts signify?

Sideroblastic anemia; Excess iron in mitochondria = pathologic

9

What is another name for shistocytes? With what kinds of pathology should you associate shistocytes?

Helmet cells; (1) DIC (2) TTP/HUS (i.e., microangiopathic hemolytic anemia) (3) Traumatic hemolysis (i.e., metal heart valve prosthesis?)

10

With what kind of pathology should you associate sickle cells?

Sickle cell anemia

11

With what kinds of pathology should you associate spherocytes?

(1) Hereditary spherocytosis (2) Autoimmune hemolysis

12

With what major kind of pathology should you associate teardrop cells?

Bone marrow infiltration (e.g., myelofibrosis)

13

With what kinds of pathology should you associate target cells? What is a good mnemonic to remember this?

(1) HbC disease (2) Asplenia (3) Liver disease (4) Thalassemia; HALT said the hunter to his TARGET

14

What leads to the formation of bite cells?

Oxidation of hemoglobin sulfhydryl groups leads to denatured hemoglobin precipatation = Heinz bodies & damage to RBC membrane --> formation of bite cells (when spleen attempts to remove Heinz body)

15

What are Heinz bodies? With what kinds of pathology should you associate Heinz bodies? In what condition are Heinz body-like inclusions seen?

Precipitation of denatured hemoglobin (due to oxidation of hemoglobin sulfhydryl groups); GP6D deficiency; Alpha-thalassemia

16

What are Howell-Jolly bodies? How are they normally handles? In what kinds of patients do Howell-Jolly bodies occur?

Bsophilic nuclear remnants found in RBCs; Normally removed from RBCs by splenic macrophages; Patients (1) with functional hyposplenia or asplenia (2) after mothball ingestion (napthlene)