Hem & Onc - Physiology (Blood Groups) Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Hem & Onc - Physiology (Blood Groups) Deck (15):
1

What will you find on the RBC surface and in the plasma of patients in blood group A?

A antigen on RBC surface & anti-B antibody in plasma

2

What will you find on the RBC surface and in the plasma of patients in blood group B?

B antigen on RBC surface & anti-A antibody in plasma

3

What will you find on the RBC surface and in the plasma of patients in blood group AB?

A and B antigens on RBC surface & no antibodies in plasma

4

What will you find on the RBC surface and in the plasma of patients in blood group O?

Neither A nor B antigen on RBC surface; both antibodies in plasma

5

Which blood group is considered the "universal donor of plasma", and why?

AB - because it does not have any antibodies in its plasma (i.e., nothing to attack the blood cells of any recipient)

6

Which blood group is considered the "universal donor of RBCs", and why?

O - because it has neither A nor B antigen on RBC surface (i.e., nothing for antibodies in recipient plasma to attack)

7

Which blood group is considered the "universal recipient of plasma", and why?

O - because it has neither A nor B antigen on RBC surface (i.e., nothing for antibodies in donor plasma to attack)

8

Which blood group is considered the "universal recipient of RBCS", and why?

AB - because it has no antibodies in plasma (i.e., nothing to attack donor blood cells)

9

In terms of blood transfusions, how is AB blood type "universally" regarded?

Universal donor of plasma & recipient of RBCs

10

In terms of blood transfusions, how is O blood type "universally" regarded?

Universal donor of RBCs & recipient of plasma

11

What is Rh antigen?

Antigen that may be found on RBC surface (in addition to A and B antigens)

12

What are the key differences between anti-A and anti-B antibodies versus anti-Rh antibodies?

anti-A and anti-B = IgM (do not cross placenta); anti-Rh = IgG (does cross placenta)

13

What should you be concerned about for Rh- women who are pregnant, when, and why?

WHAT: Hemolytic disease of the newborn (erythroblastosis fetalis) WHEN: Subsequent pregnancies (with Rh+ fetus, AFTER birth of a preceding Rh+ fetus) WHY: Rh- mothers exposed to fetal Rh+ blood (often during delivery) may make anti-Rh IgG. In subsequent pregnancies, anti-Rh IgG crosses the placenta, causing hemolytic disease of the newborn (erythroblastosis fetalis) in the next fetus that is Rh+

14

Again, what is erythroblastosis fetalis? What is given to prevent it, and why?

Rh- mothers exposed to fetal Rh+ blood (often during delivery) may make anti-Rh IgG. In subsequent pregnancies, anti-Rh IgG crosses the placenta, causing hemolytic disease of the newborn (erythroblastosis fetalis) in the next fetus that is Rh+; Rho (D) immune globulin for mother at first delivery to prevent initial sensitization of Rh- mother to Rh antigen

15

What effects can incompatible blood transfusions have on patients?

Immunologic response, hemolysis, renal failure, shock, death