Quiz 2: Dermatology Flashcards Preview

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Flashcards in Quiz 2: Dermatology Deck (50):
0

What is an acute inflammation of the epidermis?

Eczema

1

What are the 5 primary characteristics (gross morphology) of eczema?

Red, oozing, crusting, papules, vesicles

2

Scratching eczema may lead to what?

Lichen simplex chronicus

3

What are the characteristics of the histopathology of eczema?

Spongiosis, epidermal microvesicles, parakeratosis, acanthosis, dermal edema, dermal infiltrates

4

What is the primary immunological difference between contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis?

Contact dermatitis is cell mediated hypersensitivity (type IV); atopic dermatitis is an allergy (IgE/Type I)

5

What is the characteristic lesion of erythema multiforme?

Target lesion

6

What are 6 common etiologies of erythema multiforme?

Herpes simplex, any serious infection, drug rashes, paraneoplastic syndromes, Lupus/polyarteritis/dermatomyositis, idiopathic

7

What are 3 characteristics of the histopathology of erythema multiforme?

Early perivascular lymphocytic infiltrate, dermal edema, vesicles and lymphocytes along the d/e junctio

8

What is a severe form of erythema multiforme?

Stevens-Johnson syndrome

9

What causes large regions of epidermis to come off in Stevens-Johnson syndrome?

Lysis between epidermis and dermis

10

What are 3 common etiologies of psoriasis?

Drugs (B-blockers, Ca channel blockers, antimalarials), alcohol, HLA-C

11

2/3 of patients with psoriasis have a strong association to what?

HLA-C

12

What is the characteristic gross morphology of psoriasis?

Pink, salmon, or violaceous plaques (annular or serpiginous shape); silvery scales, erythroderma

13

What are 6 primary skin locations for psoriasis?

Elbows, knees, scalp, lumbosacral areas, intergluteal cleft, glans penis

14

What is present in 30% of psoriasis cases?

Nail morphology

15

What is an Auspitz sign?

Multiple, minute bleeding points when the scale is lifted from the plaque.

16

What are the primary characteristics of the histopathology of psoriasis?

Acanthosis, downward elongation of rete ridges, miotic figures, stratum granulosum thinned or absent

17

Thickening of the stratum corneum, often associated with a qualitative abnormality of the keratin.

Hyperkeratosis

18

Modes of keratinization characterized by the retention of the nuclei in the stratum corneum. On the mucous membranes, ... is normal.

Parakeratosis

19

Hyperplasia in the stratum granulosum, often due to intense rubbing.

Hypergranulosis

20

Diffuse epidermal hyperplasia

Acanthosis

21

Surface elevation caused by hyperplasia and enlargement of contiguous dermal papillae

Papillomatosis

22

Abnormal keratinization occurring prematurely within individual cells or groups of cells below the stratum granulosum.

Dyskeratosis

23

Intercellular edema of the epidermis

Spongiosis

24

Intracellular edema of keratinocytes, often seen in viral infections

Hydropic swelling (ballooning)

25

Infiltration of the epidermis by inflammatory or circulating blood cells

Exocytosis

26

Discontinuity of the skin exhibiting incomplete loss of the epidermis

Erosion

27

Discontinuity of the skin exhibiting complete loss of the epidermis and often portions of the dermis and subcutaneous fat

Ulceration

28

Formation of vacuoles within or adjacent to cells; often refers to basal cell-basement membrane zone area.

Vacuolization

29

Referring to a linear pattern of melanocyte proliferation within the epidermal basal cell layer. ..... melanocyte hyperplasia can occur as a reactive change or as part of a neoplasm of melanocytes.

Lentiginous

30

What are the 4 major skin cancers?

Actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, malignant melanoma

31

What condition is localized atypia of the epidermis, a precursor to SCC in situ?

Actinic keratosis

32

What is the etiology of actinic keratosis (2)?

UV light, arsenic

33

What is the morphology of actinic keratosis?

Tan, brown, red, or skin color lesions less than 1cm, rough like sand paper

34

What is the clinical significance of actinic keratosis?

If untreated, may progress to SCC

35

What histopatholotical characteristic of actinic keratosis proceeds SCC in situ?

Full thickness atypia

36

What is the 2nd most common skin cancer in older people exposed to sun?

Squamous cell carcinoma

37

What is the gross morphology of squamous cell carcinoma?

Exophytic, sharply defined red, scaling plaques, nodular, may ulcerate

38

What is the histopathology of squamous cell carcinoma?

Highly atypical cells at all epidermal levels, can spread to the dermis, metastasis is a late event

39

What is a "symmetrical, cup shaped tumor with a central depression filled with keratin debris"?

Keratocanthoma

40

What is the most common skin cancer in older people exposed to sun?

Basal cell carcinoma

41

Where is the only place basal cell carcinoma grows?

Only grows where there are hair follicles

42

What is the gross morphology of basal cell carcinoma?

Telangiectactic papule or nodule, may or may not be pigmented, a "rodent ulcer"

43

What are the 2 types of basal cell carcinoma?

Multifocal, superficial; nodular

44

Where is basal cell carcinoma mostly located?

On the face

45

What are the ABCDE of malignant melanoma?

Asymmetry, Border, Color, Diameter, Elevation

46

What are a few other suspicious signs of malignant melanoma?

Rapid growth, bleeding, itchy, sloughing

47

What are the 4 types of malignant melanoma?

Lentigo maligna, superficial spreading, acral-lentigous, nodular

48

Which type of melanoma is the most common?

Superficial spreading

49

Which 2 types of melanoma are the most aggressive?

Nodular, acral-lentigous