Aphasia Flashcards Preview

SLP Praxis > Aphasia > Flashcards

Flashcards in Aphasia Deck (44):
1

3 types of Aphasias

Fluent
Nonfluent
Subcortical

2

What is the most common cause of aphasia

cerbralvascular accidents

3

This type of stroke is caused by a blocked or interrupted blood supply to the brain

Ischemic Strokes

4

blockage or interruption may be caused by two kinds or arterial disease

thrombosis or Embolism

5

This is a collection of blood material that blocks the brain

thrombus

6

this a traveling mass of arterial debris or a clump of tissue from a tumor that gets lodged in a smaller artery and thus blocks the flow of blood

embolism

7

These strokes are caused by bleeding in the brain due to ruptured blood vessels

hemorrhagic strokes

8

A general definition of aphasia

a loss or impairment of language caused by a recent brain injury. comprehension and expression of language as well as reading and writing may be impaired

9

Caused by damage to the posterior inferior frontal gyrus of the left hemisphere of the brain.

Brocas aphasia

10

Brocas area is supplied by what artery

upper division of the middle cerebral artery

11

Can you have Brocas aphasia with an intact Brocas area?

yes

12

What are some different types of nonfluent aphasias?

Brocas,
Transcortical Motor Aphasia,
Mixed transcortical Aphasia
Global Aphasia

13

This nonfluent variety of aphasia is caused by lesions in the anterior superior frontal lobe often below or above Broca's area which is not affected

Transcortical motor Aphasia

14

This nonfluent aphasia has intact repetition skills

Transcortical Motor Aphasia

15

these patients tend to exhibit such motor disorders as rigidity of upper extremities, absence or poverty of movement (akinesia), lowness of body movement (bradykinesia), buccofacial apraxia, and weakness of the legs.

Transcortical Motor Aphasia

16

this variety of nonfluent aphasia is caused by lesions in the watershed area of the arterial border zone

Mixed Transcortical Aphasia (MTA)

17

this non fluent aphasia is characterized by severe echolalia

Mixed Transcortical Aphasia (MTA)

18

this non fluent aphasia is characterized by severely impaired auditory comprehension

Mixed Transcortical Aphasia (MTA)

19

caused by extensive lesions affecting all language areas (the perisylvian region)

Global Aphasia

20

What are the different types of fluent Aphasias

Wernickes Aphasia
Transcortical Sensory Aphasia
Conduction Aphasia
Anomic Aphasia

21

this Aphasia is caused by lesions to the wernicke area (the posterior portion of the superior temporal gyrus in the left hemisphere of the brain)

Wernickes aphasia

22

Wernickes area is supplied by what artery

the posterior branch of the left middle cerebral Artery

23

these patients are usually free from obvious neurologic symptoms such as paralysis

Wernicke Aphasia

24

this fluent aphasia is caused by lesions in the tempo parietal lobe especially in the posterior portion of the middle temporal gyrus

Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

25

the transcortical sensory area is supplied by the

posterior branches of the left middle cerebral artery

26

whats the difference between Wernickes Aphasia and Transcortical Sensory Aphasia

repetition is intact with patients that have TSA

27

this aphasia is caused by lesions in the regions between Brocas and Wernickes; especially in the supramarginal gyrus and the arcuate fasciculus

Conduction Aphasia

28

Disproportionate impairment in repetition is a distinguishing impairment of this aphasia

Conduction Aphasia

29

Unlike with Wernickes this type of fluent aphasia has good to normal auditory comprehension

Conduction Aphasia

30

the distinguishing factor for this one is that generally language functions except naming are relatively unimpaired

Anomic Aphasia

31

this type of aphasia is caused by lesions in the basal ganglia and surrounding structures in the left hemisphere

Subcortical Aphasias

32

What are some common Aphasia assessments

Boston Diagnostics Aphasia Examination (BDAE)
Western Aphasia Battery WAB
The Minnesota Test for Differential Diagnosis of Aphasia

33

Name two functional tests for Aphasia

ASHA functional assessment of communication skills for adults
Communicative abilities in Daily Living

34

Most current research shows treatment for Aphasia is

effective

35

If a patient has a lesion in this region than their prognosis is better

Posterior Superior Temporal Lobe (PST)

36

What are some ineffective ways to increase comprehension

Louder Speech and video presentations of stimuli

37

What is the term for loss of previously acquired reading skills due to recent brain damage

Alexia

38

term for difficulty in learning to read, this difficulty is often genetically based and is manifested in childhood.

Dyslexia

39

term for the loss or impairment of normally acquired writing skills due to lesions in the foot of the second frontal gyrus of the brain

Agraphia

40

Term for impaired understanding of the meaning of certain stimuli even though there is no peripheral sensory impairment --> patients can feel, hear, and see stimuli but can not understand their meaning.

Agnosia

41

Auditory Agnosia is characterized by

impaired understanding of the meaning of auditory stimuli
normal peripheral hearing
difficulty matching objects with their sounds
normal visual recognition of objects

42

Auditory Verbal Agnosia is characterized by

PURE WORD DEAFNESS
impaired understanding of spoken words
normal peripheral hearing
normal recognition of nonverbal sounds
normal recognition of printed words
normal or near normal verbal expression and reading

43

Visual Agnosia is characterized by

impaired visual recognition of objects which may be intermittent
normal auditory or tactile recognition of objects

44

Tactile Agnosia is associated with

impaired tactile recognition of objects when visual feedback is blocked (blindfold)
impaired naming of objects client can feel with their hand