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Flashcards in Captivity Deck (36)
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1

What does captivity mean?

Imprisonment? Held against will?

2

To what extent are humans in society captive?

We are bound by laws, conventions and rituals

3

When should captive breeding be done?

When natural numbers of species are low, or their habitat has been destroyed, degraded

4

What is the ultimate goal of captivity?

To reunite the species with its original habitat

5

What is in situ conservation?

Conservation in its original habitat

6

What is ex situ conservation?

Conservation not in its original habitat

7

Give an example of where ex situ conservation may be carried out for animals

In zoos, wildlife parks or game reserves

8

Give an example of where ex situ conservation may be carried out for plants

In botanical gardens, educational establishments, seed banks

9

Why do some species decline in the wild?

Inbreeding, habitat loss, competition from invasive species, overexploitation

10

What happens if populations of wild animals were too small, which type of conservation is suitable?

Not in situ, more likely ex situ as high likelihood of failure if population was too small

11

Historically, what have zoos been used for?

Collections of animals, like a hobby

12

How did zoos evolve?

They evolved into places of public exhibition and entertainment

13

What is the current status of zoos?

They are used for conservation, education (biology and status of species involved)

14

Traditionally what type of species was best represented in zoos?

Large mammals – e.g. gorilla

15

What about the huge numbers of endangered invertebrates?

They are not well represented in zoos, but money gained from donations towards conservation of larger animals such as the gorilla can be used for their conservation

16

What is the best conservation strategy?

In situ is the best option

17

Why is in situ strategy the best strategy?

It allows for the natural preservation or wild communities, allows natural evolutionary change.

18

Give an example of two species that have been bred in captivity after going extinct in the wild

Père Davids deer
Przewalski’s horse

19

What is the purpose of ex situ strategies?

Educational value to conservation

Can periodically release captive bred individuals into the wild to maintain their numbers and genetic variability

20

What are three limitations of ex situ strategies?

Population sizes are normally small due to limited facilities in zoos. I.e sizes of enclosures can be small

Adaptation. Species may adapt to being in captivity

Learning. Species may lose knowledge that they would gain in the wild

21

Give two more examples of limitations to ex situ strategies

Genetic variability. Species may all come from one locality

Vulnerability. Entire populations can be destroyed by natural disasters

22

Describe ex situ conservation in plants

We use plants for crops, medicine and horticultural

23

Give a benefit of ex situ conservation in plans

Education and awareness of plant diversity

Their seeds can be stored and used in reintroductions in the future

24

Define botanical gardens

They are institutions that hold documented collections of living plants for the purposes of scientific research, conservation, display and education

25

How many botanical gardens are their worldwide?

1500

26

How many plant species do worldwide botanical gardens have?

35,000 species (representing 15% of the world’s total flora)

27

Kew gardens aims to conserve what percentage of the world’s total flora?

10% in the Millennium seed bank

28

What are the benefits of botanical gardens?

Plants are easier to maintain in controlled environments

They can be grown in quantity and pruned to size

29

What are the purposes of seed banks?

Important for native and agricultural preservation

30

Varieties of seeds which are disease resistant are good for what?

Production!