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Conditions (2nd year) > Healing > Flashcards

Flashcards in Healing Deck (18)
0

What factors impede healing?

Age
Nutrition
Health Status of individual (ie.diabetes)
Medications (ie. anti-coagulants, corticosteroids, NSAIDs)

1

What are the 3 phases of healing?

Inflammation
Proliferation (fibroblastic remodelling)
Maturation (differs for every individual)

2

How do you describe the inflammatory phase?

Redness
Heat
Swelling
Pain
Loss of Function

3

What is the 1st mechanism of the inflammatory phase?

Local vasoconstriction
-reduction in volume of blood flow promotes increased blood cell viscosity or resistance to flow

4

What is the 2nd mechanism of the inflammatory phase?

Platelet Retraction
-provokes clotting as individual cells combine w/each other & fibrin to form mechanical plug
- prevents invasion from other foreign bodies & bacteria

5

What is the 3rd mechanism of the inflammatory phase?

Vasodilation
-brings neutrophils & macrophages to rid the area of debris & infectious agents through phagocytosis
- ⬆️ blood flow to area causes swelling
-hematoma develops

6

What happens during the Proliferation phase?

Involves repair & regeneration of injured tissue & takes approx. 3 days post injury through the next 3-6 weeks
- new blood vessels develop (angiogenesis)
- fibrous tissue formation (fibroplasia)
- generation of new epithelial tissues (re-epithelialization)
- wound contraction

7

What happens during the Maturation phase?

Involves maturation of newly formed tissue into scar tissue
- fibroblastic activity
- increased organization
- decreased tissue water content
- reduced vascularity
- return to normal histochemical activity

8

Scar tissue tends to be....

Fibrous
Inelastic
Non-vascular
Less strong & less functional than original tissues
Development of scar typically causes wounds to shrink, resulting in ⬇️ flexibility of affected tissues

9

What is proprioception?

Ability to determine the position of a joint in space

10

What is Kinesthesia?

Ability to detect movement

11

What is Physiological Movement?

Results from active muscle contraction which are voluntary
(Flex, ext, rot, abd, add)

12

What are Accessory Movements?

Manner in which one articulating surface moves relative to the other (roll,spin,glide)
Necessary for full ROM to take place

13

What is a concentric muscle contraction?

Muscle fibres contract while shortening

14

What is eccentric muscle contraction?

Muscle fibre contract while lengthening
- critical for deceleration of limb motion
( baseball pitchers need eccentric lateral rot. strengthening
-also use plyometric
-very tough on tissue & is done in the maturation/remodelling stage

15

What is isokinetic muscle contractions?

Fixed speed w/ accommodating resistance
Incorporated during the later stages of proliferation phase
Can also be used for objective measurements of strength, endurance & power ratios

16

When are isometric contractions used?

-Early stages of rehab (after inflammation) & during immobilization
-Useful when full ROM will do further damage to injured tissue
-Increase static strength
-muscle pumping action (I.e. W/ankle swelling)

17

What type of tissues heal fastest?

Skeletal muscle