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Flashcards in Instructional Design Deck (33)
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1

Is also known as Lesson Plan – Systematic plan to facilitate learning toward specified competencies
or objectives at the unit or subject level in a curriculum

Instructional design

2

Instructional Design Elements

- Situational Analysis
- Learning Objectives
- Learning Activities
- Student Evaluation

3

Situational Analysis

- Curricular goals
- Learners characteristics
- Instructional Resources
- constraints

4

Learning Objective

- Knowledge, skills, and attitude
- Student competencies
-Terminal (end of the subject
- Intermediate (unit or lesson)

5

Learning Activities

- Selection and organization
- Content
- Learning activities
- Content

6

Student Evaluation

- Types of evaluation
- Tools
- Test Blueprint
- Details of test administration

7

• Where are we now
• Diagnosis of needs (Taba, 1962)
• Process of examining factors that exist in the environment or society where the curriculum is going to be implemented.

Situational analysis

8

who and how many; what knowledge, skills and attitudes are they bringing to the course

Learners

9

Learner characteristics examples

field dependent vs field independent;
learners with surface approach vs learners with deep approach;
understanding the characteristics/differences leads to
better teaching strategies and the like

10

how will my course contribute to the objective of the curriculum

Teachers/institutional objectives

11

What resources are available to me in terms of faculty, facilities, materials and time that will be useful in the conduct of my course?

Resources available/constraints

12

the resources available determine what can realistically be accomplished in terms or objectives and learning activities

Instructional resources

13

• What is our direction
• Key element in instructional design
• Specification of the desired learning outcomes or competencies as a result of learning experience at the end of unit or subject
• Stated in the form of knowledge, skills and attitudes
• Provide direction in selection of content and learning activities and selection of assessment methods and tools
• There should be congruences among objectives, content, learning activities and assessment methods

Learning Objectives

14

Qualities of learning objectives

Clear
Relevant
Attainable
Adequate
Measurable

15

specifies the desired behavior (performance) to be demonstrated under a given situation (condition)

Clear

16

clearly contributes to higher-level objectives and to the future work (professional responsibilities or tasks) of
students

Relevant

17

realistic or can be achieved through the learning experiences provided using resources available

Attainable

18

includes all essential knowledge, skills, and attitudes that the desired learning requires

Adequate

19

specifies the standards or criteria by which attainment of the objectives can be determined

Measurable

20

Words open to many interpretations

To know
To understand
To really understand
To appreciate
To fully appreciate
To grasp the significance of
To enjoy
To believe
To have faith in

21

Words open to fewer interpretations

To write
To recite
To identify
To differentiate
To solve
To construct
To list
To compare
To contrast

22

Guidelines in Formulating Objectives

1. Derive your learning objectives from the knowledge, skills and attitudes (task analysis) defined in the
professional responsibilities that are within the purpose and scope of your subject or unit.
2. Start with an action verb that indicates the desired learner performance.
3. Use only one learning outcome at a time.
4. Specify the condition under which the student’s performance will be tested when such test situation is not clearly implied.
5. Specify the standard or minimum acceptable level or degree of performance unless they are clearly implied.

23

: The first step in instructional planning

identify and define our instructional objectives as learning outcomes

24

learning outcomes

a. Provides direction for the instructor; conveys his instruction intent to others
b. Provides guide for selecting the subject matter, the teaching methods, and materials to be used during
instruction
c. Provides a guide for constructing tests and other instruments for evaluation of student achievement

25

“Good” and “Bad” Objectives

1. Realizes the importance of neatness
2. Explains the importance of neatness.
3. Predicts the outcome of an experiment.
4. See the value of an experiment.

26

• How are we doing
• Determine how much the students have learned
• Assessment findings serve as bases for making instructional or administrative decision

Evaluation of student learning

27

(1) Provide both students and teachers with the information they need to improve the learning process while it's happening.
(2) Monitor progress toward a goal or objective.
(3) When the chef tastes the soup.

• Formative Evaluation

28

(1) Generally administered at the end of a unit or course.
(2) Measure the mastery of learning standards.
(3) When the guests taste the soup

• Summative Evaluation

29

Data need to be collected for Learning objectives

Cognitive
Psychomotor
Attitudes

30

Data need to be collected for Base of assessments

Tests
Demonstrations
Observations