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Flashcards in McKenzie/Williams and Tissue Injury Deck (37)
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1

What are the three McKenzie syndromes?

Derangement, dysfunction, postural

2

Loading strategies centralize or make the symptoms better with what McKenzie syndrome?

Derangement

3

Which McKenzie syndrome only has pain produced at limited end range?

Dysfunction

4

Which McKenzie syndrome has pain only on static loading with no effect of repeated movements?

Postural

5

Which McKenzie syndrome involves end-range stress of normal structures?

Postural

6

Which McKenzie syndrome involves end-range stress of shortened structures?

Dysfunction

7

Which McKenzie syndrome involves anatomical disruption or displacement within the motion segment?

Derangement

8

What are the most common motions for postural syndrome?

Lower cervical and lumbar flexion

9

What is the "motto" associated with the dysfunction syndrome?

No pain, no gain (stretching of the shortened tissue to gain ROM)

10

What is the PROCESS in which distal SX that began in the spine are abolished in a distal to proximal direction and remain better over time until all pain is abolished?

Centralization

11

What is the term for what occurs DURING the application of the loading strategy distal SX are being abolished?

Centralizing

12

What is the term for what happens AFTER the application of the loading strategy all of the distal SX have been abolished and only back pain remains?

Centralized

13

Centralization characteristics only occur in which syndrome?

Derangement

14

What type of change is ALWAYS seen with derangement syndrome and its centralization characteristics?

LASTING

15

What does it meant when peripheralization occurs with derangement syndrome?

Symptoms move away from the center of the body into the extremities

16

What type of antalgia is seen with posterior derangement? Anterior? Relevant posterolateral?

Posterior = kyphotic antalgia
Anterior = lordotic antalgia
Relevant posterolateral = extreme coronal/lateral antalgia

17

What are examples of extreme coronal antalgia seen with relevant posterolateral derangement?

Acute torticollis or lumbar scoliosis

18

What motion is decreased with posterior derangement?

Extension (good flexion because it's flexion antalgia)

19

How do you treat posterior derangement?

Increase extension ROM and compress discal material ("push it back where it belongs")

20

What would the treatment times and duration be for posterior derangement?

10 times every 2-3 hours

21

Does anterior derangement come with increased lordosis or kyphosis?

Lordosis

22

What is the treatment for anterior derangement?

Flexion loading to increase ROM and compress discal material

23

What motions are used to treat relevant posterolateral derangement?

Sagittal plane loading (either flexion or extension)

24

What are the conditions called for posterolateral derangement that don't respond to sagittal plane loading?

Relevant (because lateral motion is required)

25

What ROM is normal with relevant posterolateral derangement and which is impeded?

Flexion = normal
Extension = impeded

26

What is the treatment for relevant posterolateral derangement?

Lateral glide loading of disc followed by extension loading (remember, flexion is OK)

27

William's exercises use what type of pelvic tilt to reduce lumbar lordosis?

Posterior tilt (stretch of hamstrings and hip flexors)

28

What are the three phases of tissue injury/healing?

Inflammation, repair, remodeling

29

What is failure tolerance?

Failure of tissue occurs when load exceeds strength of tissue

30

What concepts can affect failure tolerance?

Time, load, repetitions, characteristics of lifter