Retropharyngeal, Lateral Pharyngeal, and Peritonsillar Cellulitis/Abscess Flashcards Preview

Nelson - Respiratory System > Retropharyngeal, Lateral Pharyngeal, and Peritonsillar Cellulitis/Abscess > Flashcards

Flashcards in Retropharyngeal, Lateral Pharyngeal, and Peritonsillar Cellulitis/Abscess Deck (14):
1

Retropharyngeal abscess occurs most commonly in what age group

<3-4 y/o

2

T/F Majority of children with retropharyngeal abscess have a history of recent ear, nose, or throat infection

T

3

Retropharyngeal abscess is much less common in older children and adults because

Retropharyngeal nodes involute after 5 y/o

4

Provides definitive diagnosis for retropharyngeal abscess

Incision and drainage of an abscessed node

5

T/F Retropharyngeal and lateral/parapharyngeal infections are most often polymicrobial

T

6

Usual pathogens of retropharyngeal and lateral/parapharyngeal abscesses

1) Group A strep 2) Oropharyngeal anaerobic bacteria 3) S. aureus

7

Treatment of pharyngeal abscesses

IV antibiotics with or without surgical drainage

8

Antibiotics that may be used for pharyngeal abscesses

3rd gen cephalosporin + ampi/sul or Clindamycin

9

Uncommon but characteristic infection of the parapharyngeal space

Lemierre disease

10

Asymmetric tonsillar bulge with displacement of the uvula

Peritonsillar cellulitis/abscess

11

Peritonsillar cellulitis/abscess: MC pathogens of

1) Group A strep 2) Mixed oropharyngeal anaerobes

12

Peritonsillar cellulitis/abscess: Treatment

Surgical drainage and antibiotic therapy

13

Peritonsillar cellulitis/abscess: Tonsillectomy should be considered if

1) Failure to improve within 24 hours of antibiotic therapy and needle aspiration 2) History of recurrent peritonsillar abscess or recurrent tonsillitis or complications from peritonsillar abscess

14

Feared complication of peritonsillar abscess

Rupture abscess with resultant aspiration pneumonitis