7: Clinician's perspective Flashcards Preview

CLASP: Alcohol 2017/18 > 7: Clinician's perspective > Flashcards

Flashcards in 7: Clinician's perspective Deck (41)
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1

Scotland is the UK country with the (highest / lowest) rate of alcohol-related deaths.

highest

2

Which sex has the higher rate of alcohol-related deaths?

Males

3

Alcohol-related disease is a large financial ___ on the NHS.

burden

4

How many hospital admissions per year are related to alcohol?

> 1 million

5

What factors affect the impact of alcohol consumption on health?

Age

Gender

BMI

Drinking patterns

Volume of alcohol consumed

Length of time (infrequent, frequent, chronic)

6

What may chronic alcoholics experience 6-8 hours after their last drink?

Alcohol withdrawal

7

The severity of alcohol withdrawal symptoms depends on the degree of the patient's alcohol ___.

dependence

8

The presentation of which condition, following alcohol withdrawal, should be treated as a medical emergency?

Delirium tremens

9

How is alcohol withdrawal assessed in the wards?

Which drug is then used to manage it?

Assessed at set intervals for symptoms and scored

Chlordiazepoxide / diazepam

10

What are some "positive" brain/NS effects of alcohol?

Sedative, mild anaesthetic

Pleasurable

Sense of wellbeing, reduced inhibitions, euphoria

11

What are some negative behavioural effects of alcohol intoxication?

Accidental injury

Aggression

Drowsiness

Slurred speech, unsteadiness

Loss of consciousness

12

A common neuro presentation of alcohol withdrawal is ___.

seizures

13

Alcohol can precipitate seizures in patient who are known to have ___.

epilepsy

14

What are some nerve/muscle consequences of heavy drinking?

Peripheral neuropathy - alcohol damages peripheral nerves + nutrient deficiencies

Compression neuropathy - e.g falling asleep on your own arm

Myopathy - muscle pain, both acute and chronic

15

What is the reversible condition caused by thiamine deficiency in heavy drinkers?

What are the symptoms?

How is it treated?

Wernicke's encephalopathy

Ataxia, unsteadiness, abnormal eye movements

Thiamine replacement therapy

16

What is the irreversible condition caused by thiamine deficiency in heavy drinkers?

What is the exact pathology?

What are the symptoms?

Korsakoff syndrome

Cerebral atrophy

Memory loss, confabulation

17

How is Korsakoff syndrome treated?

No cure - abstinence from alcohol and adequate nutrition

18

Which common neuro disease is common in chronic drinkers?

Dementia

19

Which type of stroke commonly presents in chronic drinkers?

Haemorrhagic stroke

20

People who drink alcohol in moderation seem to have a(n) (increased / reduced) risk of coronary artery disease.

reduced

21

Which kind of cardiomyopathy is seen in chronic drinkers?

Dilated cardiomyopathy

22

Why does alcohol cause dilated cardiomyopathy?

Impaired ventricular function

Chronic inflammation

Fibrosis

23

Which arrythmias may be seen in acutely intoxicated patients?

Atrial fibrillation

Holiday heart syndrome (supraventricular tachycardia)

24

Chronically, alcohol excess may lead to which arrythmia?

Long QT syndrome

25

Alcohol is the leading cause of ___ disease.

liver

26

What is the pathomechanism of cirrhosis in regular heavy drinkers?

Regular heavy drinking

> Steatosis

> Inflammation (acute -> chronic)

> Fibrosis

27

What liver disease is almost universal in heavy drinkers and is reversible with abstinence?

Alcoholic fatty liver disease i.e steatosis

28

What is an acute, life-threatening liver disease associated with heavy drinking?

What are the symptoms?

How is it treated?

Alcoholic hepatitis

Jaundice, coagulopathy (heavy bleeding), fever etc.

Abstinence and nutrition, wait and see

29

Is alcoholic hepatitis the same as cirrhosis?

No, acute life-threatening presentation typically seen in young people

30

What develops alongside cirrhosis?

Portal hypertension