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Flashcards in 8) Patient Reported Outcomes Deck (24):
1

Why do we measure health?

Indication of need for healthcare
Target resources
Effectiveness of interventions
Quality of health services
Monitor patients' progress

2

What are some ways that health can be measured?

Mortality, morbidity and patient based outcomes

3

What is the advantage of using mortality as a measure of health?

Easily defined

4

What are the disadvantages of using mortality as a measure of health?

Not always recorded accurately
Not good for assessing outcomes or quality of care

5

What is the advantage of using morbidity as a measure of health?

Routinely collected

6

What are the disadvantages of using morbidity as a measure of health?

Not always reliable
Doesn't reveal patients' experience

7

Why do we use patient based outcomes to measure health?

There are more conditions where aim is management over cure
Patient centred
Iatrogenic effects of care
Biomedical tests not enough

8

What are PROMs?

Patient reported outcome measures - measures of health directly from patient

9

What can the results of patient based outcomes be used for?

Clinical audits
Compare interventions or hospitals
Health status of population

10

What are some examples of PROMs that the NHS uses?

Hip and knee replacements, groin hernia and varicose veins

11

Who is the data obtained from PROMs of interest to?

Commissioners as indicates quality of care
Patients for decision making

12

What are the challenges in using PROMs?

Minimising time and cost
Getting high rates of patient participation
Avoiding misuse
Appropriate output of data

13

What is health related quality of life?

Functional effect of an illness and its consequent therapy, as perceived by the patient

14

What aspects are considered in HRQoL?

Physical function
Symptoms
Psychological
Social
Cognitive function
Personal constructs
Satisfaction with care

15

In what way can HRQoL be measured?

Qualitative or quantitative (questionnaires)

16

What are the two important properties of PROMs?

Valid and reliable (internally consistent)

17

What are generic QoL measures?

Can be used with any population and cover perceptions of overall health

18

What are specific QoL measures?

Evaluates a series of health dimensions specific to a disease, site or dimension

19

What are the advantages generic QoL measures?

Broad range of health problems
Comparisons can be made
Detect unexpected effects of intervention

20

What are the disadvantages generic QoL measures?

Less detailed
Loss of relevance
Less sensitive to changes due to an intervention
Less acceptable to patients

21

What are some examples of generic QoL measures?

Short Form 36
EuroQoL EQ-5D

22

Give examples of specific QoL measures:

Disease specific: Asthma QoL questionnaire
Site specific: Oxford Hip Score
Dimension specific: Beck Depression inventory

23

What are the advantages of specific QoL measures?

Relevant, sensitive to change and acceptable

24

What are the disadvantages of specific QoL measures?

Cant be used if people don't have disease
Limited comparison
May not detect unexpected effects