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Flashcards in Monitoring Biodviersty Deck (76)
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1

Why do we monitor

Changes over time to stress. (Climate change)
Responses to specific interventions. (Wild fire management)
Recovery of a species (reintrudrion)

2

Why can biodiversity itself not be applied to real world problems

It is too broad and vague a concept

3

Why is biodiversity so broad

It’s the number of genes, species ecosystem but also processes like interspecific interactions, natural disturbances, nutrient cycles

4

What are the different ways to monitoring the impacts on dendribates (frog)

Climate factors controlling vegetation and patterns of species richness across regions.
Habitat availability and landscape linkages.
Climate controls on regional and local disturbance regimes.
Physiological tolerances of individual species.
Dispersal capacities of individual species.
Genetic variations within and among different populations of a species.

5

What are the parts of the the conceptual figure of biodiversity

Structural
Compositional
Functional

6

What does structural mean

Physical organisation or patterns like habitat complexity.

7

What does compositional mean

Identity and richness like species diversity and genetic diversity

8

What does functional mean

Ecological and evolutionary processes like gene flow and nutrient cyclin

9

What is the conceptual figure of biodiversity at the regional scale

C: distribution, richness, endemism.
S: heterogeneity, fragmentation, patch size.
F: disturbance processes, hydrological processes

10

What is the conceptual figure of biodiversity at the community (ecosystem scale)

C: relatively abundance and proportions of threatened species.
S: soil, vegetation, horizontal/ vertical heterogeneity.
F: herbivory, productivity.

11

What is the conceptual figure of biodiversity at the population (species) level

C: abundance, biomass.
S/ range, population structure.
F: population fluctuation and phenology

12

What is the conceptual figure of biodiversity at the genetic scale

C: allelic diversity, presence of specific alleles.
S: population size, heterozygosity.
F: inbreeding depression, geneflow.

13

What makes a good indicator species

Sensitive to detect change.
Widely relevant/ disturbed.
Provides continuous assessment over wide range.
Results are independent of sample size.
Easy to measure.
Cost effective.
Differentiates between natural and anthropogenically induced change.
Relevant to ecologically significant issues.

14

What are the different indicators in Brazil

Birds
Dung beetles
Moths
Small mammals

Birds and dung beetles are well studied and perform important ecological functions.

15

What does resolution do

It’s about scale and precision and tells us what tools

16

What are the range of methods to monitoring

Camera trapping
Field measurements
Remote sensing

17

Example of field measurements

DBH
Species idenitfixauofn

18

Example of remote sensing

Conventional aircraft
Satellite
UAV photos

19

What are the analyses of monitoring

Time series
Spatial statistics
Indicies
Comparisons

20

Examples of indicies

Heterogentiy, connnectivity, diversity

21

What are conservation drones

Low cost unmanned aerial vehicles

22

What do conservations drones do

Survey wildlife
Monitor and map terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems.
Support enforcement of protected areas.

23

Example of conservation drones

Drones to monitor organgutabs who make their nests on top of trees

24

What are camera traps

Remotely activated camera equipped with a motion, infrared or light sensor as a trigger

25

Why do we use camera traps

Detected elusive species e.g low density, nocturnal or shy. Can get to remote or inhospitable sites and good for Mark-recapture studies

26

Example of camera trapping

Sri Lankan leopards.
To monitor: population size and trends. Home range and territoriality. Feeding ecology. Landscape connectivity.

27

Why should we conserve birds and butterflies

Good indicators of environmental change.
Charismatic species.
Rare species.
Vulnerable.
Important to the ecosystem.

28

Example of a charity organisation for birds

RSPB - royal society for the protection of birds
BTo - British trust for ornithology

29

Facts of the RSPB

Leading charity for the last 110 years.
UK headquarters, 3 national offices, 9 regional offices, 175 local groups.
A million current members.

30

Example of a butterfly charity organisation

Butterfly conservation