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Flashcards in Cardiovascular Drugs Deck (79)
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1

What are 2 things a positive inotrope does?

- Increase cardiac output
- Increase atrial filling pressure

2

Adrenergic agonists help to maintain what?
Prevent what?

- Maintain arterial blood pressure
- Prevent tissue ischemia

3

When vasopressors are administered what occurs to heart rate?

Slows heart rate

4

Adrenergic agonists are not recommended in the face of what?

Hypovolemia

5

What are 2 examples of adrenergic agonists?

- Bronchospasm (asthma)
- Life threatening allergic reactions

6

What are 3 possible routes of administration for adrenergic agonists?
What is not an effective route?

- SQ, IV, Intra-tracheal
- Oral

7

What is are 3 examples of a drug that is an A1, A2, B1, B2 agonist?

- Epinephrine
- Norepinephrine
- Ephedrine

8

What effect does epinephrine have on heart rate?
On vascular tone?

- Increases HR
- Increases vascular tone (vasoconstriction)

9

What is the strongest vasopressor that can be administered during cardiopulmonary arrest?

Epinephrine

10

Is epinephrine the go to drug for hypotension?
Why?

- No
- Can be potent tachyogenic drug. Also potent vasoconstrictor which decreases organ profusion

11

What are 2 indications for epinephrine?

- Treat life-threatening allergic reactions
- CRI in non-responsive hypotension

12

Epinephrine decreases what?

Renal blood flow

13

Epinephrine increases what 6 things?

- Blood pressure
- Peripheral vascular resistance
- Myocardial contractile force
- Heart rate
- Cardiac output
- Bronchodilator

14

What are 4 disadvantages of epinephrine?

- Severe vasoconstriction can lead to decrease perfusion of tissues
- Increase in oxygen consumption (increased cardiac work)
- Can induce ventricular fibrillation (tachyarrhythmias)
- Increase sensitivity to tissue hypoxia

15

Epinephrine should be left for what?

Resistant hypotension or CPA

16

Does norepinephrine produce more or less severe tachycardia than epinephrine?

Less severe tachycardia

17

What is norepinephrine used for?

Significant non-responsive hypotension

18

Do you usually use norepinephrine with cardiac arrest?

No

19

What does norepinephrine decrease?

Renal blood flow

20

What are 4 things increased by norepinephrine?

- Blood pressure
- Peripheral vascular resistance
- Myocardial contractile force
- Heart rate

21

What is an example of an A1, B1, B2 agonist?

Dopamine

22

What are 2 indications for dopamine?

- Treatment of hypotension
- Increase urine output

23

What does dopamine decrease?

Partial pressure of oxygen in blood (interferes with ventilatory response)

24

What are 4 things dopamine increases?

- Myocardial contractility
- Renal blood flow
- Glomerular filtration rate
- Systemic vascular resistance (only seen with high dose)

25

How does dopamine need to be administered?

As a CRI

26

What is a low dose of dopamine?
What is seen with a low dose?

- 1-4 ug/kg/min
- Stimulates dopamine receptors

27

What are 4 results of dopamine receptor stimulation?

- Splanchnic vasodilation
- Natriuresis
- Diuresis
- Alterations in renal & GI blood flow

28

What is natriuresis?

Excretion of sodium in the urine

29

What is diuresis?

Increased discharge of urine

30

What is a medium dose of dopamine?
What are 2 things seen with a medium dose?

- 5-10 ug/kg/min
- Increase HR/contractility, mild change in vascular resistance