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Flashcards in Sleep Deck (19)
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1

What is sleep?

State of unconsciousness from which the individual can be aroused by normal stimuli

2

What is coma?

State of unconsciousness from which the individual cannot be aroused and doesn't respond to stimuli

3

What part of the brain does sleep originate from?

Pons (reticular formation)

4

What other parts of the brain are involved in sleep?

Hypothalamus and it's suprachiasmatic nuclei

5

What neurotransmitter is released for wakefulness and from where?

Orexin (hypocretin), from the hypothalamus

6

What hormones are known to be associated with sleep?

Seratonin
Melatonin

7

How is the level of consciousness assessed in an awake person?

Behaviour, speech patterns and content, reading and writing
Electroencephalogram (EEG)

8

What EEG recordings are studied?

Amplitude
Frequency

9

What are the main waves patterns that can be seen?

Alpha
Beta
Theta
Delta

10

What is the common EEG of a person in a relaxed, awake state?

High frequency
High amplitude
Alpha waves

11

What is the common EEG of a person who is alert and awake?

Even higher frequency
Low amplitude
Asynchronous waves (beta waves)

12

How are theta waves characterised?

Low frequency
Amplitude can vary enormously

13

How are delta waves characterised?

Low frequency
High amplitude

14

How many stages of sleep are there?

5

15

What happens as a person moves towards deep sleep?

Amplitude increases
Frequency decreases

16

What is commonly found in sleep deprived subjects?

Cognitive function impairment
Physical performance impairment
Sluggishness
Irritability

17

What functions does sleep support?

Neuronal plasticity
Learning and memory
Cognition
Clearance of waste products from CNS
Conservation of whole body energy

18

How does sleep change over a lifetime?

Total sleep time decreases through childhood
Percentage of REM sleep decreases

19

What is insomnia?

Chronic inability to obtain the necessary amount or quality of sleep to maintain adequate daytime behaviour