Imaging in Inflammatory Disorders and Infection Flashcards Preview

Principles of Disease > Imaging in Inflammatory Disorders and Infection > Flashcards

Flashcards in Imaging in Inflammatory Disorders and Infection Deck (25)
Loading flashcards...
1

What are different kinds of molecular imaging?

Radionuclide imaging (CT/X ray)

Positron emission tomography (PET)

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Optical imaging

2

What is gamma radation?

Occurs due to radioactive decay of unstable isotopes

3

What is radiopharmaceuticals?

A combination of radioactive element and a pharmaceutical element

4

What are the properties of an ideal isotope?

Half-life similar to length of examination

Gamma emitter, rather than alpha or beta

Energy of gamma rays should be 50-300keV

Readily available at hospital site

Easily bound to pharmaceuitcal component

5

What are common radiopharmaceuticals?

Hydroxyl-diphosphonate (bone)

Dimercapto-succinic acid (kidney)

Hexamethyl-propine amine oxime (brain)

Macroaggregated albumin (lung)

6

What is hydroxyl-diphosphonate used to scan?

Bone

7

What is dimercapto-succinic acid used to scan?

Kidney

8

What is hexamethyl-propine amine oxime used to scan?

Brain

9

What is macroaggregated albumin used to scan?

Lung

10

What is a gamma camera used for?

To detect gamma rays and convert them into an image

11

What is the process of a gamma camera?

1) Nuclear energy is inside the nucleus of the radioactive element

2) Gamma electromagnetic energy (gamma ray is emitted from the patient)

3) Image crystal produces flashes of light

4) Converted into electrical energy to display an image

12

What does the image quality of a gamma camera depend on?

Radiation dose

Collimator

Metal objects

Proximity of area of interest to the camera

13

What is SPECT?

Single proton emission computed tomography

14

What is a SPECT scan?

A nuclear version of a CT scan where the camcer is roated around an area of interest

15

What does PET stand up for?

Positron emission tomography

16

What is a PET scan?

Uses nucleotide decay by positron emission

17

What does a proton breakdown into during a PET scan?

Proton breaks down into a neutron and a positron

18

How many detectors does a PET scan use?

2 detectors that capture the gamma ray at each side of the patient and are used to create an image

19

What are common PET radionuclides and their half lifes?

18F 110 minutes

11C 20 minutes

13N 10 minutes

15O 2 minutes

20

What is 18F?

Flurodeoxy glucose

21

What is the process of 18F (flurodeoxy glucose) uptake?

Up taken like glucose being broken down into similar chemicals, stopping at 18FDG-6-P (equivalent of glucose6-phosphate)

22

What is FDG taken up by?

Brain

Myocardium

Stomach

Liver

Spleen

Colon

Urinary tract

23

What is the main risk of using radiation?

It is ionising and can induce cancer

24

What is the benefit of using radiation?

The contributions to treatment and diagnosis of the patient

25

How does the equilvalent dose compare for different kinds of imaging?

They have different equivalent doses with different risks of developing cancer in your lifetime